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Society summer school aims to attract pupils to the law

20 June 2017

A new "summer school" for pupils considering a career in law is being held this week by the Law Society of Scotland.

Part of the Society’s work to boost fair access to the legal profession, the four day event at its Edinburgh offices will give the students an opportunity to find out about studying law at university and what it takes to become a solicitor.

Those taking part will learn about different areas of the law, visit the courts in Edinburgh and get a glimpse of working life at a large commercial law firm. They will also meet a number of senior Scottish solicitors and solicitor advocates, who will talk about their careers and offer a masterclass in advocacy.

The group will also take part in Street Law sessions, which aim to bring the law to life through interactive workshops with current law undergraduates. The sessions will focus on criminal law, organ donation and the law around children.

Rob Marrs, head of education at the Society, commented: “Our first ever summer school will offer a real insight into what pupils might expect if they choose to study law and aim for a career in the legal sector.

“We know from our research that fewer than one in 12 entrants to the LLB come from disadvantaged background and that some schools rarely have pupils applying to study law. We strongly believe that we should have a diverse legal profession which reflects our wider society and that the route to becoming a solicitor should be accessible to anyone with the ability and ambition to become a solicitor regardless of their background. Our Street Law programme and this year’s summer school aim to help open up opportunities for young people who may not have considered studying law as an option.

“I’m delighted that so many of our solicitor members have been willing to take part in the summer school sessions and help to inspire the young people attending this week. I hope this week marks the first of many summer schools for would-be Scottish solicitors.” 

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