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Knowledge base becomes smarter

16 October 17

Registers’ knowledge-base microsite with its support for customers has developed in the year since its launch; however, we want to hear how to improve it further

by Registers of Scotland

 It is almost a year since we launched the knowledge-base microsite (kb.ros.gov.uk) that provided a new home for registration guidance and additional support content. The knowledge base was initially developed using information gathered from workshops with our customer service colleagues on frequently asked questions and from interviews with solicitors and paralegals. This approach fundamentally changed the way we display and write our guidance.

The knowledge base replaced a number of individual pdf documents on separate topics with a system where the content is task-based, accessible and searchable. Since we launched the knowledge base we have continued to develop its functionality, updating and adding to its content. These changes have made the search function more focused, giving the user a better list of suggested articles, with synonyms; it also can handle some spelling errors by suggesting alternatives. We have improved readability, page layout and in-page navigation.  

We think these changes have made the site better, making it a useful source of information for legal professionals and other stakeholders. Over the last year we have received positive feedback; however, we want to hear more from users of the site so that we can keep the site relevant to your needs.

Rejections: another go

One of the topics covered in the knowledge base is the one-shot rule and rejections, an issue that we know causes the legal profession additional work and aggravation. The introduction of the Land Registration etc (Scotland) Act 2012 in December 2014 saw a pronounced increase in rejections rates as we all adapted to the new legislation.

While the overall rate of rejections has reduced since those early days, we are determined to reduce, and ultimately eliminate, rejections. As an example, our new digital discharge service has been designed to ensure that all applications are processed without rejections. 

We have published a number of blogs on how to avoid rejections, and by contacting your account manager you can access information on your rejections to identify trends. Account managers have also gathered your feedback on how RoS can improve.

We have used this information to improve our consistency in how we handle rejections. We have also used this information as we consider some changes to the Land Register Rules etc (Scotland) Regulations 2014 to reduce the chances of an application being rejected in the future. The new draft rules are planned to be published in the next few weeks.

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